Radon carbon dating

Posted by / 24-Jan-2017 06:20

Radon carbon dating

One of the implied assumptions in radiocarbon dating is that levels of atmospheric carbon-14 have remained constant over time.This turns out not to be exactly true, and so there is an inherent error between a raw "radiocarbon date" and the true calendar date.If evolutionary ages are accurate, the helium should have leaked into the atmosphere millions of years ago.RATE researchers also found radiohalos and fission tracks, which are microscopic scars in minerals.Such scars could only exist if the parent isotope's decay rate had been dramatically accelerated.Nobody yet knows what (or who) accelerated nuclear decay in the past, just as nobody yet knows what mechanism causes the sun-related decay of silicon-32 or radon-222.For example, although at the time of the Brookhaven and Stanford reports solar neutrinos were implicated, it appears that neutrinos are just too small and too few.The chances seem too slim for enough neutrinos to collide with enough radioactive atoms to have caused the observed fluctuations.

It cannot be applied to inorganic material such as stone tools or ceramic pottery.

If this, or a similar factor, altered nuclear decay rates of the systems that are routinely used in rock dating, then any "age" determination provided by this method would have been compromised.

And this is exactly what the Institute for Creation Research's project Radioisotopes and the Age of the Earth (RATE) reported in 2005.

In particular, RATE scientists found that radioisotope decay rates had been accelerated by orders of magnitude in the past and that one or more such acceleration events vastly inflated the apparent age of rocks (i.e., the age derived from the assumption that radioisotope decay has been constant through time).

For example, RATE found a high accumulation of helium, a product of radioisotope decay, still trapped inside small crystals.

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But carbon-14 is slightly radioactive: it will spontaneously decay into nitrogen-14 by emitting an anti-neutrino and an electron, with a half-life of 5730 years.